Wage & Hour

  • May 20, 2024

    United Healthcare Skimped On OT, NM Nurse Says

    United Healthcare misclassified New Mexico-based case manager registered nurses as overtime-exempt even though they have overtime-eligible responsibilities, cheating them out of overtime wages when they work over 40 hours in a week, an ex-nurse said in a complaint in federal court.

  • May 20, 2024

    Rocket Mortgage Agrees To Pay $3.5M To End OT Suit

    Rocket Mortgage agreed to pay out $3.5 million to end a collective suit in Arizona federal court accusing it of failing to pay mortgage brokers for the after-hours work they performed.

  • May 17, 2024

    Trucking Co. Dodges Misclassification Suit, For Now

    A trucking company can temporarily escape claims that it misclassified drivers as independent contractors because the driver lodging the suit failed to show jurisdictional diversity, an Illinois federal judge ruled.

  • May 17, 2024

    Manager Says Travel Co. Fired Her For Promotion Complaints

    A corporate hotel booking service gave lackluster performance reviews to a female national sales manager because she had taken maternity leave and fired her after she raised concerns about being passed over for promotions in favor of a less experienced male co-worker, according to a lawsuit in Colorado federal court.

  • May 17, 2024

    Justices' Arbitration Ruling To Slow Wage Appeals

    Workers will struggle to appeal orders compelling arbitration now that the U.S. Supreme Court has said federal courts must stay cases when claims are sent to arbitration instead of dismissing them, attorneys said. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Fails To Win Order Barring Retaliation On Pork Workers

    A Tennessee federal judge rebuffed a request from the U.S. Department of Labor to bar a pork producer from retaliating against workers providing information about wages, ruling that the department had failed to show that any retaliation had occurred.

  • May 17, 2024

    Industry Emboldened After Justices Galvanize Agency Attacks

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court said "extraordinary" and "far-reaching" attacks on administrative enforcers can skip agency tribunals and go straight to federal district court, ambitious challenges to regulatory powers are rapidly gaining traction, and the high court is poised to put them on an even firmer footing.

  • May 17, 2024

    Chicago Tribune Accused Of Underpaying Female, Black Staff

    A group of Chicago Tribune journalists sued the paper and its parent Alden Global Capital in Illinois federal court on Thursday alleging sex and race discrimination that has caused more than 50 reporters and editors to get paid thousands of dollars per year less than their white male colleagues.

  • May 17, 2024

    Delivery Apps Illegally Adding Extra Fees In Seattle, FTC Told

    DoorDash and Uber illegally charge "deceptive and unfair" junk fees to customers to cover the companies' costs to comply with a Seattle law mandating minimum wages for app-based workers, a consumer told the Federal Trade Commission in a complaint.

  • May 17, 2024

    NY Forecast: Doctor's Disability Bias Case Goes To 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear a former New York University hospital doctor's bid to revive his suit claiming the hospital discriminated against him on the basis of his disability by denying him work accommodations before firing him. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 17, 2024

    DOL Wants Early Win In Support Co. Misclassification Suit

    The U.S. Department of Labor urged a Florida federal judge to grant it a pretrial win in its suit accusing a customer support services provider of misclassifying 22,000 workers as independent contractors, saying it's clear the company has near-total control over their work.

  • May 17, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Justices To Hear If Prop 22 Constitutional

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for California Supreme Court oral arguments regarding the validity of the Proposition 22 ballot measure from 2020. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 17, 2024

    Worker's OT Suit Against Oilfield Co. Pushed To Arbitration

    An oilfield services company can push into arbitration an ex-oil rig worker's unpaid overtime suit, after a Texas federal judge sided with the company, staying the suit pending arbitration.

  • May 16, 2024

    FTC Can't Make Albertsons, Kroger Produce Divestiture Docs

    An administrative law judge on Thursday denied the Federal Trade Commission's "premature" bid to compel Kroger and Albertsons to fork over documents related to negotiations for the companies' expanded divestiture plan amid the commission's in-house challenge to the grocers' merger.

  • May 16, 2024

    EPA Doctor Not A Whistleblower For Slamming Lead Plan

    A former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pediatrician and epidemiologist who publicly criticized the EPA's plan to reduce lead in drinking water as inadequate is not protected by federal whistleblower law, the Federal Circuit said Thursday.

  • May 16, 2024

    Home Health Co., Aides Settle OT Suit Over Shift Tracking

    A home health care organization and two workers asked an Ohio federal judge Thursday to sign off on a $62,000 settlement resolving claims that the company underpaid overtime wages by separately tracking the day and night shift hours that employees worked in a single week.

  • May 16, 2024

    High Court Decision Requiring A Stay Raises More Questions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday finding that federal courts must honor a request to stay a case after ordering the dispute into arbitration leaves an important subsequent question unresolved: What happens if neither party requests a stay?

  • May 16, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Signature Wasn't Rebutted On Arbitral Pact

    A worker failed to show that a signature in an employee handbook containing an arbitration clause wasn't his, a California state appeals court ruled, flipping a trial court's decision that denied a mining company's bid to arbitrate his wage and hour suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Wis. Appeals Court Undoes Corrections Workers' Wage Class

    A Wisconsin appeals court dissolved a class of state Department of Corrections employees who argued they are owed pay for the time they spent undergoing security checks and walking to and from their assigned work posts, ruling a lower court used an invalid legal theory in certifying the group.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Bronx DA Worker Says Discrimination Suit Should Stand

    A former employee at the Bronx District Attorney's Office said Thursday she supported her claims that the office discriminated against her for seeking medical leave and denied her a promotion because she's Black, urging a New York federal court to keep alive her suit alive.

  • May 16, 2024

    Delta, Flight Attendants Ink $16M Deal To End Wage Suit

    Delta Air Lines flight attendants reached a nearly $16 million settlement with the company in an almost decadelong suit accusing the airline of wage statement violations, they told a California federal judge, saying the "extremely favorable" deal should be approved because it would give class members close to full reimbursement.

  • May 16, 2024

    SC Convenience Store Pays $154K For OT Violations

    A gas station and convenience store in South Carolina paid nearly $154,000 for denying workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Must Stay Suits Sent To Arbitration

    The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded Thursday that federal courts do not have discretion to toss a case once it's decided that the claims belong in arbitration, ruling in a wage and overtime suit brought by delivery drivers against their employer.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Deadline To Appeal Furlough Denial Is Flexible

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday revived a Pentagon employee's dispute seeking an exemption from a furlough, saying that a missed 60-day deadline to appeal the denied exemption does not put the matter out of federal courts' jurisdiction.

  • May 15, 2024

    Georgia Justices Weigh State Immunity In Trooper's Wage Suit

    Georgia's Department of Public Safety urged the state's highest court on Wednesday to undo a Georgia Court of Appeals decision that revived a state trooper's suit alleging that the department failed to pay him owed overtime for time spent in training, arguing that the state never waived its sovereign immunity privilege.

Expert Analysis

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

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    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • What To Expect From The DOL's Final Overtime Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's final overtime rule dramatically increases the salary threshold for white collar workers to be exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, so employers should prioritize identifying the potentially affected positions and strategically consider next steps, say Leslie Selig Byrd and Deryck Van Alstyne at Bracewell.

  • Data Shows H-2B Wages May Be Skewed High By Sample Size

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    Occupational Wage and Employment Statistics wage data from April illustrates that smaller sample sizes from less populated areas may be skewing prevailing wages for H-2B visas artificially high, potentially harming businesses that rely on the visa program, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Refresher On Employee Qualifications For Summer Interns

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    Before companies welcome interns to their ranks this summer, they should consider the extent to which the interns may be entitled to the same legal protections as employees, including the right to be paid for their hours worked and to receive at least minimum wage and overtime, says Kate LaQuay at Munck Wilson.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.